Workshop One: Design for Dementia

10.00 – 15.00, Friday 14th October 2016

Bringing delegates together with local older people, and students from the Universities of Edinburgh and Stirling, this workshop introduced the skills and techniques of co-design.

The first part took us into the heart of Edinburgh’s UNESCO World Heritage site where, working in four groups, we used a ‘Neighbourhoods for Life – dementia-friendly’ checklist as the catalyst for a ‘walk and talk’ conversation about a small, mixed-use area adjacent to the Royal Mile.

We then moved to a design studio environment, where each group worked on two drawings: one showing aspects of their site they’d like to save; and one showing things they’d like to change.

After lunch, each group used a basic 1:500 model, simple materials, sketches, photos and text to work up a proposal for their site to make it more dementia-friendly.

We finished the session with a whole-group discussion about the proposals and a short Q&A.

 

Leaders:

Mobility, Mood and Place Co-design Studio Leader Iain Scott, with Derek Fraser (tutor at Edinburgh College of Art), Ziwen Sun (PhD candidate in Architecture and Landscape Architecture), Máire Cox (Communicator) and Dr Richard Ward (Researcher and Lecturer at the University of Stirling).

References:

• Mobility, Mood and Place (2016) The A-Z of Co-Design: A brief introduction to participatory design (available online www.mobilitymoodplace.ac.uk/a-z). • Mitchell, L., Burton, E. 2004. Neighbourhoods for Life: a Checklist of Recommendations for Designing Dementia-Friendly Outdoor Environments. The Housing Corporation and Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development, Oxford. • Karssen, A. & Otte, B. (2014). Model making: conceive, create, convince. • Al-Kodmany, K. (1999). Using visualization techniques for enhancing public participation in planning and design: process, implementation, and evaluation. Landscape and Urban Planning 45(1), 37–45.


> Find out about Workshop Two: Urban Brainwear

> Find out about Workshop Three: Places, then and now, how do they influence our health?

> Take me back to the main Conference page