Cryptoforestry: a blog

The William Porter Reformatory by mallix on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivative Works licence.

The William Porter Reformatory by mallix on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivative Works licence.

Readers with an interest in the urban landscape, psychogeography or the cultural significance of trees and forests may want to have a look at the blog Cryptoforestry.
The author’s interests range from exploring feral woodlands and recording the disruptive effects of wild plants on the built environment in his native city Utrecht, to foraging and the “edible city” movement, via anthropological studies of the indigenous people of the Amazon.

What is a Cryptoforest? The author offers the following definitions:

Cryptoforests are:

1) Feral forests (Planted tree zones, for instance along motorways, that have been allowed to become wild to the point that their wildness is outgrowing their manmadeness.)
2) In limbo forests (Tree-covered plots that feel like forests but technically probably aren’t; states of vegetation for which lay-language has no name.)
3) Incognito Forests (Forests that have gone cryptic and are almost invisible, forests in camouflage, forests with a talent for being ignored.)
4) Precognitive forests (Lands that are on the brink of becoming forested, a future forest fata morgana.)
5) Unappreciated forests (Forests regarded as zones of waste and weed, forests shaming planners, developers, and the neighbourhood. NIMBY forestry.)

(Found via the excellent BLDGBLOG, a popular source of commentary and speculation on the more esoteric aspects of architecture, landscape architecture and urbanism.)

14. January 2011 by jfurnes1
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